Week 6 Workbook Activity – Turn your attention to the final assignment

PAIBOC, which stands for purpose, audience, information, benefits, objects and context, is a useful way to map out some of the important elements of when writing an assignment. It doesn’t help the structure of a speech; however, it helps a brainstorm and keeps in mind elements in which the speech has to meet.1

The PAIBOC below is referred to the final assignment in COMM12033.2

Purpose

The purpose of the speech, presented by the president of Murrumbidgee Landcare, is to inform the Rotary on Biochar. On the other hand, the purpose of the video new release is to inform the Murrumbidgee residents of the implications and potentials associated with Biochar.3

Audience

The main audience for the speech is Rotary. Rotary is a worldwide organisation of business, professional and community leaders. It gives people gives you the opportunity to ‘pay it forward’ and to have a positive while developing business networking opportunities and building lifelong friendships.4 The Murrumbidgee Rotary Club was chartered in 2006 and currently hosts 16 members ranging from 22- 50 years of age.5 As Murrumbidgee is a rural are; therefore most of its members are agricultural based industrial professionals, farmers, small local business owners or rural property owners.

Information

Detailed information needs to be sought on the term Biochar and it’s (who, what, when, where and why). This information does not necessarily need to be technical but just straight for easy to interpret, by doing this it will stop miscommunication and misunderstanding of certain ‘technical terms’. Extensive information needs to be sought on the Murrumbidgee Region as a whole and its current stance on Biochar.

Benefits

The speech need to written in a particular way in order to show that there are certain benefits to the audience. A good way of doing this is by using a ‘puzzle-solution technique’ outlined by Clayman and Heritage in Talk in Action6. It states,

‘This format embodies emphasis and projectability. In the format, the speaker arouses the interest of the audience by first a problem or puzzle. By then delivering the point as the solution to the puzzle, the speaker emphasises the point while also providing the audience with advance warning that an applaudable point is coming, thus inviting applause at the first possible point at which the solution emerges.’ 7

If executed effectively and correctly then this format could be the most effective way for the speech to convey the benefits of Biochar to the audience.

Objections

The majority of the audiences objections will be associated with who, what, when, where and why of Biochar. This can include different beliefs and opinions on Biochar and a low level of understanding of the topic. This means that I need to sufficiently and effectively address each of these elements in detail throughout the speech. Emphasise ultimately needs to be about Biochar and its benefits and not so much on its implications. This will ensure that the speech provides the audience with an understanding at their level in order for them to gain the appropriate knowledge to favour Biochar.

Context

There will be relevant constraints of the communicative situation that influence how the speech is perceived by the audience, These elements include things like the audiences readiness, knowledge and perception of Biochar, social and economic influences and current issues surrounding Biochar.

1 Kate, Ames, 2012, COMM12033 Speech and Script: study guide, CQUniversity, Gladstone.
2Ibid.
3Ibid.
4Rotary International, “The rotary club of wagga wagga murumbidgee”, International Rotary, http://www.murrumbidgeerotary.org.au/ (accessed August 15, 2012)
5Rotary, “A gateway to clubs in australia”, Rotary, http://www.rotaryaustralia.org.au/index.php (accessed August 15, 2012)
6James Heritage and Steven Clayman, Talk in Action: Interactions, Identities and Institutions (West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010), 263-287.
7Ibid.

Reference

Ames, Kate, 2012, COMM12033 Speech and Script: study guide, CQUniversity, Gladstone.

Heritage, James, and Steven Clayman, 2010, Talk in Action: Interactions, Identities and Institutions, West Sussex:wiley-Blackwell.

Rotary, “A gateway to clubs in australia”, Rotary, http://www.rotaryaustralia.org.au/index.php (accessed August 15, 2012)

Rotary International, “The rotary club of wagga wagga murumbidgee”, International Rotary, http://www.murrumbidgeerotary.org.au/ (accessed August 15, 2012)

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